Old West Petticoat Dealer "Madame Mustache"

Eleanor Dumont, known as "Madame Mustache in frontier gaming halls was really one of the historical phenomena of that era. As a young retailer, he became a "super star" with twenty-one gaming and 39th gigs circling the West.

Debate exists at Dumont & # 39; s on the birthplace; some say he was a French immigrant by the name of Simon Fule, while others say he was born in New Orleans around 1829. It is known that Madam Simon Fule turned around in the Bella Union Hall and Games Hall in San Francisco in the spring. Since 1850, he has taken the roulette table and created a great sensation. Forty-ninety, hungry for the mere look of a beautiful woman, the young French woman shuddered with oily alabaster skin, shining black eyes, a flaming smile, and long dark blows to her shoulders. For several days, the men stood behind each other to lose their golden dust-shattered doll, which, during a close inspection, showed a thin line of hair beneath her upper lips.

The Bella Union was full of players who wanted to see or play against Madame Gul. Not to be found in other gaming halls, which quickly introduced French women to chair their roulette wheels. Over the next few years, women launderers or dealers became the main product of most gaming activities at Portsmouth Square. At the time she appeared, Mrs. Disappe's bull disappeared from the scene, and her name was not mentioned again in any records or newspaper reports.

A few years later, in 1854, the stage rolled across the dusty streets of Nevada, California, and a well-rounded woman appeared. Along with Parisian dress and expensive jewelry, the whole city was ringing in mysterious hair by a French woman coming down from the trainer. He was small and dense, with eyes like a dowel, a curly dark haired hammer, and a slight hint of a diphthong beneath the upper lip. She said that her name was Madame Eleanor Dumont and offered nothing about her past – a perfect woman of mystery.

Satisfied with his transformation from Madam Dumont, the game wicket hired a place in the city center and hung a sign calling its foundation "Wing-et-Un" (French for "twenty-one"). City residents were invited to visit Bridge Street and play with Madame Dumont. Although there were more than a dozen playgrounds in Nevada, Wing-et-Un was the undisputed queen of the sports crowd. Twenty-one in Dumont & # 39; It was the game of choice and he was the master of the game, kindly expressing regret as he collected his winnings. When he closed his table, he ordered champagne bottles to be chased to the losers, which led most miners to say that "they would lose Madame sooner than anyone else would."

Miners and townspeople gathered at the facility, which was described by both winning money and the charisma and ingenuity of the French housewife. Decorum was strictly applied, customers could not use vulgar or vulgar language. Strangely enough, the rowdy crowds of miners could not resist the polite demands of the fluctuating owner. Within a short period of time, he moved his operations to larger districts, where he added faro, lucky, roulette tables and dealer staff. He named his new gaming room the Dumont Palace and hired a Nevada City gambler named Devin Tobin to be his manager-partner.

Then, for the next two years, the money circulated every day, so much so that Tobin, who had moved to the National Hotel with Dumont, wanted to master the operation. As he tried to make his move, Dumont was angry aloud. Just because they shared the bed, they didn't make him the head of the outfit. He gave her an ultimatum. if he did not like the arrangement, then "get out of hell." He certainly didn't like the settlement, so after the final settlement he left Nevada and headed east.

When gold in Nevada finally dried up, Eleanor sold her operations and began touring other mining camps in northern California. He opened his game on the Yule River Bullard & # 39; In the settlements of Bar, Danubeil and Sierra; He then moved to mining camps on Peter River and later on Clement. In 1857, he worked for more than a year at the Foster Foster & 39th City Hotel in Columbia for twenty years before moving to Virginia City, where he managed an armchair boasting more than $ 30,000 worth of furniture. During this series of mining camps in California, he added "extras" to his table operations. The visit was his wreath, which required a "room rent".

In the early 1860s, Dumont traveled to the golden blows of Idaho and Montana, and by the end of the tour, he was approaching his 30th birthday. The passing years were not good for him. The long nights of cards and sweatshirts began to suffer, and his once legendary look slowly faded. Looking lost and incarcerated, he lost the size of his cup and years ago, when only nuanced upper lips, began to darken, earning him eggplant – Madame mustache.

At Bannack, he teamed up with the men at McHarney's two-storey playroom to show off the cribs above for quick rehearsals with young dancers working in the hall below. They underwent surgery and went for only a short time before gunning down his partner with another gambler named McFarlane. What to do? Never leaving to beat Dumont, the bloody corpse dragged, a fresh sawdust scattered on the floor, and the hall reopened, as if nothing had ever happened. He was later thrown in jail for posting $ 1,000 bail on MacFarlane, who agreed to be his new partner less than an hour after the murder. Yes, sir, the French woman never missed the opportunity of entrepreneurship.

Leaving Banak, Dumont traveled to Fort Benton in the turmoil of Montana's goldfields. Here she duplicated her previous work featuring booze, beauties, and bets. However, the glitter was lost from his earlier investments, where elegance and décor prevailed. He was cut short by plunging into a low rent. Steamboat captain Louis Roche described Dumont & # 39; game room.

“The inside of the gambling house looked worse, even outside. The bar and playrooms were housed in one large downstairs room. A solid set of stairs led up to the second floor balcony where I could see the doors lead to about a dozen small rooms. The place smelled of fog and smelled of sweat, unwashed bodies and cheap whiskey. The floor was dirty … In one of the upper rooms I could rarely hear the drunken man's smile and the loud, shocking laughter of a woman who was quite sober. "

Dumont jumped from place to place until he decided it was time to retire from gaming, so he bought a cattle farm in California and tried for a short time to do that sincere work. Quickly realizing that he had no idea how to run a farm, he contacted a sleazy man named Mc You McKunt, who claimed that savings was a buyer of livestock. The beautiful and well-dressed McCown promised her he could take care of everything, and they tied the knot. With their marriage certificate, the ink barely dried up. He took everything he had and didn't dare.

Forced to return to the only thing he knew how to do, Dumont hit the mining camps and eventually reached Maddwood in the fall of 1876. He was treated twenty-one times in various halls and observed by journalist John O'F. Chintarin. Chicago Times: In one article he wrote: “He had a beautiful face at one time, which made crime harder to express cruelty. His eyes were shining like a cape, and he was scratching at the hands of gold dust or chips, the long white fingers of which, at sharp edges, reminded him of hemp & # 39; s thalons. "

Declining to become a dealer in low-grade playing wells, Dumont eventually strayed in 1879 in Bodie, California. At this point he usually drank in large quantities, and it was much more difficult to compete with the professional ranks sitting in his twenty's. – One table. On the night of September 7 at the Magnolia Hall, he borrowed $ 300 to buy a table against two blacks. Try as he might just didn't have it in himself. he was 49 years old, without a minor, astonished at whiskey-infused brain, and finally, when he became the last card, he was completely out of luck. With all the dignity she could muster, she was able to retrieve the chair off the table and stand up, "Gentlemen, the game is yours."

The next morning he was found dead lying next to an empty bottle of morphine. Among the personal items found on his body was a letter he had written. The letter states that the instructions on how to use its effects "make him tired of life." The: Union of Sacramento He summed up his whole life with these few lines: "Bodi. September 8: Eleanor Dumont, a woman, was found dead about a mile away from a city today to commit suicide. He was well known in mining camps. "